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Communications quality assurance managers finish workshop

MCGHEE TYSON AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Tenn. - Communications experts gather for quality assurance training and discussion at the I.G. Brown Training and Education Center here during the Air National Guard Communications Quality Assurance Managers' Workshop, May 4-8, in Wingman Hall. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Charles Givens/Released)

MCGHEE TYSON AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Tenn. - Communications experts gather for quality assurance training and discussion at the I.G. Brown Training and Education Center here during the Air National Guard Communications Quality Assurance Managers' Workshop, May 4-8, in Wingman Hall. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Charles Givens/Released)

MCGHEE TYSON AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Tenn. -- Communications experts called their first gathering for quality assurance training at the I.G. Brown Training and Education Center here successful after meeting for a full week earlier this month.

At least 62 Air Force communications experts met for the Air National Guard Communications Quality Assurance Managers' Workshop, May 4-8, in Wingman Hall.

"The class was successful in the fact it brought us all together for the first time," said Master Sgt. Crystal M. ChinQuee-Smith, with the New Jersey National Guard.

ChinQuee-Smith, a communications expert for the 108th Wing, also serves as the vice chair for the ANG's communications quality assurance managers working group. The group covers six national regions.

"The amount of knowledge shared was invaluable," said ChinQuee-Smith.

ChinQuee-Smith said that the workshop helped standardize and identify many of their duties and additional duties assigned across the ANG's wings and units. Some of those duties were not taught during their formal, Air Force communications schools.

The working group also discussed and developed approaches to improve.   

"We have 23 take-a-ways to work on and will be splitting those up between all regions," said ChinQuee-Smith. "Getting the chance to sit down and actually talk and present information was vital."

ChinQuee-Smith said that they chose the TEC for their training because of its central location and its amenities.

"We hope to return next year," said ChinQuee-Smith.