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TEC cites energy efficiency

MCGHEE TYSON AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Tenn. - The I.G. Brown Training and Education Center uses LED lighting and automatic lighting for its walkways and parking lot here Oct. 28, 2015, to manage its energy use. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Mike R. Smith/Released)

MCGHEE TYSON AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Tenn. - The I.G. Brown Training and Education Center uses LED lighting and automatic lighting for its walkways and parking lot here Oct. 28, 2015, to manage its energy use. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Mike R. Smith/Released)

MCGHEE TYSON AIR NAITONAL GUARD BASE, Tenn. -- As Energy Action Month closes this week, staff and students at the I.G. Brown Training and Education Center here can continue to improve their energy efficiency by simply flipping a switch to off, said national and local officials.

The federal government observed the special month to help decrease its energy use. The Air Force consumed $9 billion in mission-related energy last year, said officials. Mission Assurance through Energy Assurance was the month's theme.

2nd Lt. Travis Vaughn, from the base civil engineer squadron, said that staff and students can improve energy efficiency by notifying CE when problems arise. Stuck toilets and poor window and door seals are among other infrastructure problems that could contribute to high-energy bills.

"In addition, ensure that you turn things off when you are not in a room, such as lights, TVs, entertainment systems and your computer monitor," said Vaughn.

The TEC uses automatic outdoor lighting for its campus walkways, and it recently installed LED lighting around the parade field parking lot.

Vaughn also said that they designed smart energy use into the buildings under construction. That includes the storm-water drainage system installed last year under the athletic field, as well as an expected 37 percent improved overall energy efficiency when compared to an average building.

Substantial savers in upcoming renovations incorporate low-flow showerheads, low-flow faucet aerators and natural and automatic lighting, said Vaughn.

Officials also designed the construction 75 percent landfill free with 30 percent of the building materials purchased locally and derived from recycled materials.